10 Ways To Lift Your Spirit in the Winter Months

Recovery is a lifestyle you must adhere to year-round. Different times of year bring different experiences, and you must get through them to stay sober! The winter months may feel difficult or emotional for the first few years you’re sober. Today, with the complication of the coronavirus pandemic, life can sometimes feel like a struggle.

Why Is Winter Hard For People in Recovery

Few people feel like winter is their favorite season. If you’re like many people, you may find yourself in the doldrums or suffering from seasonal affective disorder, a form of depression brought on by the changing seasons. With less sunlight and colder weather, humans naturally turn into homebodies. In recovery, however, isolation can quickly turn into loneliness or depression.

There are also other reasons that people feel like winter is hard in recovery. Many people also associate the winter months with Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Years’ holidays. Of course, holidays can be challenging times for people in recovery. Sometimes you’ll feel quite emotional about the past or even feel triggered by it.

For many reasons, winter can be a challenging time for people in recovery. This winter may even seem a little more difficult due to the ongoing emotional and economic strains caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Taking care of yourself and focusing on your recovery is an integral part of the game plan. Here are some ideas to help you lift your spirit every day.

Spirit-Lifting Activities For Winter

If you live in a warm climate, you won’t have to deal with the cold. Yet there are still some effects that you have to cope with during the winter months. Holidays, shorter days in general, and less activity are all things that seasons have in common coast-to-coast.

  1. Get enough Vitamin D. Most people aren’t getting enough in the winter months because it mostly comes from the sun. Try to do something outdoors for at least fifteen minutes a day.
  2. Get exercise, even if it’s incremental. For example, take the stairs more often. Do a lap around the block later on. Walk to the bodega.
  3. Explore vegetables and fruits. Smoothies have a plethora of ingredients to help boost your body and mind. Try a recipe or two to add more nutrition to your day.
  4. Spend five minutes being mindful each morning before anything else.
  5. Do something kind for somebody else. Whether this means checking up on a loved one or cleaning up the kitchen in your group house, just try it. Helping other people feels good.
  6. Find ways to be more creative in life. Create your own winter-themed masks or make up your own dinner recipes.
  7. Find ways to reach out to others online. Create an online group focused on a hobby you enjoy.
  8. Write cards to older people or children who are hospitalized. Focus on spreading happiness to the person you’re writing to.
  9. Help out a housemate with something they’re stressed about. Getting outside of yourself is crucial, and you might have a skill you can share, such as helping with a resume or building a website.
  10. Take 30 minutes doing something you genuinely enjoy. Take a long bath, read Stephen King, or watch tutorials for surfing. As long as it’s something you like, and it hurts no one, enjoy yourself.

Consider Sober Living

Have you thought about living in a sober home? Living among other people in recovery can help you have a sense of stability. Learn more about what options are available and how we can help by calling us at 760-216-2077.