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Are You Depressed or Just “Down”?

Many people in recovery, especially when they first get clean, feel depressed, lonely or “down” every once in a while. A person with addiction has a lot of loss to mourn when they first clean. If you’re afraid, angry, or sad, you’re not alone. Depression is also something you may experience as you gain your footing in your new life in recovery.

What’s Normal, and What’s Not?

Feeling sad or depressed is normal for many people, especially when you’re first getting clean. Many of the emotions that you feel are normal and will pass as you start to process them. You may feel like you’re in mourning for your old life. That’s normal, too. Many people grieve their own lives but start to feel better once they begin to rebuild their life in recovery.

Working the 12 steps, going to meetings, and making friends with other people in recovery will help you learn to work through your emotions. Sharing your feelings with others will often help you lessen their impact.

Feeling sad, let down, or blue is one of these feelings. You may feel like you’re holding on by a thread some days, while other days you’re full of hope and energy. In most cases, these feelings will pass. You’ll experience many emotions when you’re clean and sober, and learn how to cope with them.

If you wake up depressed and go to bed depressed, for weeks on end, there may be something else going on. Depression can also be a symptom of a mental health disorder. If you feel like hurting yourself, wish you were dead, or have other deep, sad feelings that seem like they’ve been going on forever, it’s time to get help. Any depressive symptoms that seem to stop you from working on goals, or make you feel hopeless are warning signs that you need to get help.

Getting Help for Depression

Getting help for depression is important. Depression can be a disease, and like any disease, especially addiction, the only way to get better is to seek out help. If you’re comfortable, ask people in your support group to help you. A psychiatrist, therapist, or treatment professional can help you with resources. Like all of recovery, you’re not alone. There are many people in recovery who are also recovering from a mental disorder.

Remember that in recovery, you’re never alone.

Sober Living Can Help

If you’re struggling with a mental health disorder, or just want extra support, sober housing is an option many people choose to help make the transition to life without the use of drugs.

Sober housing is a great way to make new friends and start adding inspiration and empowerment to your life. Learn more about your options for serene sober living at 760-216-2077.

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