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Updated: February 26, 2021

How to Practice Patience

The COVID-19 pandemic has taught us all a lot about patience, loneliness, and resilience. No matter where you are in your recovery, you have managed to stay alive through this pandemic. Unfortunately, many people have had problems with being isolated or feeling despair. These feelings are natural, especially for the times we live in. Sometimes, though, it is hard to be patient. That’s why this article is about practicing patience. No one is perfect, and many people work on their character defects a day at a time.

Patience in the COVID-19 Era

Life man seems like it’s going in slow-motion, especially if you’re following the lockdown rules. The hardest part of the COVID-19 era for most people is the unknown.

Modern society hasn’t faced a pandemic like COVID-19, but your grandparents and great-grandparents may have lived through several epidemics. You’re living through history! While that may not be comforting, it shows how resilient you’ve become. You get up and face a day full of unknowns. You don’t drink or drug. You do your best. For many people – maybe even you – this doesn’t feel like enough. People feel like they have had to push the “hold button” in life, and time is slipping away.

Patience is an important quality to practice when you have to wait in lines or social distance. Everything that was once easy to do now takes more time!

It makes sense that learning how to be patient can help bring serenity to anxiety-provoking situations. But patience is always something you’ll need to use in your life. You’re powerless, after all, over other people, places, and things. And when you’re dealing with other people, especially employers or the government, impatience can worsen your life.

How to Practice Patience

Are you an impatient person? Are you quick to “freak out” or anger when you find out you have to wait for something you consider essential? Often people are impatient because they are anxious or upset about other things.

Here are some ways you can begin to practice patience in recovery:

  • Do breathing exercises. Don’t focus on the situation but instead focus on how your body feels as you inhale and exhale deeply. Feel your belly extend and retract. Do this for at least ten full breaths (in and out) before you open your eyes again, if possible. Learn more about breathing exercises here.
  • Say the serenity prayer. (Not everyone feels comfortable with prayer at this time, but if you believe in a higher power, the serenity prayer can help you let things go.) God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.
  • If you have to wait, plan to use the time wisely. There’s nothing wrong with taking a book to the DMV or doctor’s office and reading while you wait. Work on your step work, study for a class, or spend time doing something leisurely and relaxing like listening to meditation music. Distraction can help make waiting easier.
  • If you lose your cool, apologize for it, and move on. Everyone gets upset once in a while, and nobody is perfect. Go ahead and apologize if you snap or blow up at somebody. We’re all human, and it’s okay to make mistakes.

Sober Living Options

Living with others in a structured, safe, empathetic environment can help newcomers build skills and learn life on its terms. Learn more about what sober living options are available to you by giving us a call.

 


If you or a loved one is looking for a safe and sober home in North County San Diego, call 760-216-2077. One of our caring members is ready to answer all of your questions.

Customer Testimonials

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  •  Very Friendly staff and a great living facility

    My brother, we’ll call him James to protect his anonymity, came here after attending their detox and inpatient program. He’s had tremendous success and currently has over six months of sobriety!

    - Jeff Hanson

  • This is not your average sober living.

     My family has been reunited and we share a beautiful relationship today. By the Sea is the cornerstone of my recovery and I am forever grateful for the experience I have had with the people I consider my family.

    - Adam Herald

  • We highly recommend Mark and his facility.

    Mark answered a cold call from us when we were confused and desperate trying to help our son. Six months later he is transitioning to living on his own and we are thankful for Mark and the By the Sea community.

    - Google Reviewer

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