Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Addiction Recovery

cognitive behavioral therapy for addiction

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a popular type of therapy that most recovery centers and rehabs incorporate into their treatment programs. CBT helps people change their thoughts and behaviors to become healthier and happier in recovery.

People with substance use disorder and other mental health disorders can benefit from CBT. So many actions and reactions come from our thoughts and emotions. By becoming more aware of how beliefs influence their feelings, behaviors, and reactions, a person can also begin the process of trying new things to cope with them. CBT can also help people understand how their thoughts and feelings keep them in a cycle of addiction.

Why Change Your Thoughts With CBT?

Cognitive behavioral therapy can help you recognize negative thought processes that may hold you back from change. Usually, these thoughts are centered on certain beliefs you have about yourself. They may even go back to childhood or something somebody once said about you. By examining these thoughts, you learn that you can challenge them.

CBT can help you address problematic thoughts and feelings to overcome addiction. Many people have triggers to use, such as feeling angry or anxious. In recovery, people learn how to cope with these feelings and override the desire to get high or drunk. They replace those thoughts and behaviors with something more positive.

Addiction treatment programs are known for helping people change their perspective, attitude, and behavior to start a new way of life. But CBT helps people without addictions, too. People with PTSD, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, and other mental health disorders can benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. Some people go to therapy to help them with specific behaviors or get through life changes like a divorce.

Anyone that needs help changing their life for the better can benefit from CBT.

How Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work?

As human beings, our behavior is connected with our beliefs about ourselves and the world we inhabit. CBT helps people examine how their thoughts are related to their behavior. People addicted to drugs act differently when in the throes of addiction. Thought processes were centered on using drugs. After using, a person may have felt guilty or inadequate.

Therapists can help people examine how their thoughts and feelings contributed to their addictive behavior. Many people have self-defeating thoughts that lead to behavior they later regret.

By using CBT, addicted people learn how to identify and counter their negative thoughts with more positive outcomes. With time and practice, people learn to overcome obstacles and stay sober, making better decisions in their daily lives.

Considering Sober Living?

Are you looking for a safe, structured community with other people in recovery? Many people go to a sober living home while they continue their recovery journey. Learn more about our programs by calling at 760-216-2077.

 

 

Many people live in recovery-centered communities as a part of their recovery journey. Some people experience the community approach to recovery at inpatient drug treatment. Many people also choose a community approach to their recovery by living in sober housing. People who live in a sober living community are also part of a therapeutic community with a focus on community and healing. Sober living, based on the community model of treatment, is a great option for your recovery journey.

Why Community-Centered Treatment? How Does It Help?

The community treatment model works on helping people change in a communal setting. The environment in sober living homes focuses on recovery and positive change. Being around others with similar focus and goals can help people stay sober.

Community members are encouraged to practice honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness. Participating in a recovery community means taking responsibility for yourself and your recovery. Sometimes this means hard work, but as you continue to grow in the program, you’re given more freedom and responsibility.

Recovery work, therapy, and MAT may be a part of your treatment. However, everyone in the community will have their own specific goals and issues to work on. You will learn to live in harmony with a sober lifestyle.

What Do People In A Sober Living Community Do With Their Time?

Most community members attend 12-step meetings, have group therapy, and go out together. Some people will take to the beach or road to surf or jog. There will usually be shared chores that are alternated weekly or monthly. Grocery shopping and cooking are often communal.

Therapy and 12-step groups will be a big part of sober living. After all, staying sober comes before everything else.

The goal for a person in sober living is to use the tools they’ve acquired to continue to stay sober, reclaim their lives, and take on more responsibilities. Some people start to resolve wreckage from the past, such as missed court appearances, old speeding tickets, or charged-off credit cards. Making amends and doing the right thing are important goals to work towards.

For some participants, this means getting a part-time job or a job training program. Moving towards independence and becoming ready to move forward is a part of recovery in this stage.

Becoming Stronger Together With A Community

For many people in sober living communities, having the support of peers is vital. Active participation in group activities helps people inspire each other and continue to move towards their recovery goals.

A recovery community emphasizes group learning and peer support. People come together to rally around community members who are struggling. They also offer support to each other regularly. People in sober living homes find a family-like community where they come together, no matter their flaws, to become better people. Everyone’s goal is

Being supportive is an essential part of growing in recovery. A recovery community is a great place to practice empathy, build coping skills, and learn how to have healthier relationships. Feeling at home in a recovery community helps keep people sober, helps them practice coping skills, and helps with relapse prevention.

Learn About Sober Living Options

If you or somebody you love is looking for a recovery community, our sober housing program may suit you. Give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn more about our communities.

 

Many people who decide to get sober use tools like Medication-Assisted Treatment to reduce withdrawal symptoms and help them focus on their recovery. Sublocade is a Medication-Assisted Treatment option many people prefer because it’s only administered once a month. It is prescribed and administered by medical professionals for people with opioid use disorder who want to stay sober.

What Is Sublocade?

Sublocade contains the drug buprenorphine and is administered monthly in a medical provider’s office. For many people, it’s a safe and responsible way to go about their lives while getting relief from withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings.

Sublocade works best when the person taking it also gets counseling via drug treatment or one-on-one therapy. This can help newly sober people gain insight into themselves and understand their addiction. Opioid use disorder is manageable, but Medication-Assisted treatment is only part of managing it. Getting therapy can also help somebody learn new coping skills and learn to live a more authentic, happy life drug-free.

How Often Is Sublocade Needed?

People prescribed Sublocade need to get the injection monthly in a healthcare provider’s office. Most treatment providers will start patients with a 300mg dosage and eventually will be weaned down to a lower dose, usually 100mg. Some people will stay on 300mg longer if their healthcare provider deems it necessary.

People can use Sublocade as MAT for as long as the doctor approves. Some people will get an injection for months, while others may need to stay on it for years.

Sublocade Injections Increase Sobriety Success Rates

According to the manufacturer, in one clinical study, people treated with Sublocade were fourteen times more likely to complete their treatment programs and stay sober. 28% of people who got therapy/treatment alongside their MAT stayed sober for at least 24 months.

In the study, the group that was given a placebo only had a 3% success rate over the same period. While some people did relapse in the more successful group, everyone who stayed sober for at least 80% of those 24 months did so with the help of Sublocade.

Consider Sober Living

If you or somebody you love needs a safe space to lay their head, sober living may be the healthiest choice. Living in an environment where people work toward positive change can be inspiring and help you stay focused on your goals. Learn more about our communities by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Educational family therapy, sometimes called psychoeducation, is a type of therapy that involves members of an individual’s family. The therapy helps provide information and education on drug detox, treatment, and other aspects of recovery. Sometimes this type of therapy involves both the client and their family, as well as other peers and family members. Educational family therapy is an essential component of drug treatment for dual-diagnosed people, meaning they live with both a mental health disorder and a substance use disorder.

Why Is Educational Family Therapy Important?

Family is a big part of healing for many people in recovery. Family can play a supportive role for people in recovery. Without help, they may feel discouraged by their family members. Some family members may enable an addicted person, while others may over-criticize or try to take control of the person’s recovery. These situations are often emotionally charged. They can lead to conflict when there are communication problems. Therefore treatment centers often want to involve family members in therapy to educate them about their loved one’s disease.

Family psychoeducation is an essential service that treatment providers can facilitate. Through education and talk sessions, knowledge of addiction can help family members understand substance use disorder more clearly. Family members may also need to be educated about co-occurring conditions such as PTSD symptoms.

Educational therapy can help increase the family’s awareness of substance-use risk factors, symptoms of a substance use disorder, treatment options, and other recovery-affirming options for their loved one.

Many people who get sober do so with the support of their families. While this is not an option for everyone, when the family wants to be involved, they can help individuals make better decisions about their recovery.

More Awareness and Compliance in Recovery

For many people, a family can help keep them on task. After all, not everyone is aware of a recovering person’s schedule unless they are told about it. Knowing a person’s schedule and needs can help family members keep their loved ones on task.

Something as simple as having the family keep a calendar with the times and dates visible can help clients and their families to understand the obligations a person in recovery has. They’re working on themselves, after all. But sometimes, family members don’t know unless they are told about all the moving parts in a loved one’s recovery program.

Some family group sessions also use problem-solving to address dysfunction or negative dynamics among family members. The goal is for the family to be able to provide ongoing support and monitoring, with particular awareness of their loved ones’ needs and responsibilities in early recovery.

Bringing families together to support each other in a larger group can be a powerful experience. When peers and their families get together, they have a wealth of knowledge, strength, and hope to share. Ultimately, these types of support groups can help create a network that continues to keep in touch and support each other even once treatment has been completed.

About By the Sea Recovery

We offer safe, structured community homes with the highest sober living standards. Living in a house with a sober living culture can help you or your loved one build a strong foundation as they start their recovery journey.

Many people find comfort and community in a group setting focused on sober living. Learn more about your options and how our programs work by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Contingency management, a type of behavioral therapy, is an unusual but highly effective treatment for people who live with substance use disorder. In programs that use contingency management, people who participate agree to stay sober. They receive positive reinforcement when they do so successfully and meet specific goals the program sets. Typically, this type of reinforcement is in the form of monetary compensation, gift cards, or even prizes. Sometimes these programs will also do the same for awarding privileges within a treatment facility. (Usually, all participants are regularly drug-tested to ensure compliance and honesty.)

Who Is Contingency Management For?

Contingency management is often a good fit for people who experience multiple challenges. Substance use disorder does not discriminate, and many people who live with dual diagnoses find motivation within programs using this model.

People addicted to multiple substances may find contingency management helps them become more committed to their treatment plans. Contingency management helps people stay sober and comply with treatment plans. In California, people addicted to methamphetamine successfully completed treatment programs that used contingency management.

Contingency management is also used in therapy for people with mental health disorders who want to work on their goals.

What Kinds Of Behavior Is Rewarded In Contingency Management?

People who participate in the therapy may be rewarded for taking specific actions which help them begin and maintain their recovery. People may earn rewards for good attendance, adhering to their medications, staying sober, attending 12-step meetings, and other aspects of their treatment.

For most people in outpatient treatment, many actions may need to be taken. People who are on probation, for example, may also be rewarded for working towards other goals such as applying for jobs or going back to school. They may need to balance going to therapy and twelve-step meetings as well as work.

The treatment helps people stick to a vital routine focused on recovery. Motivation and rewards can help people stay centered in recovery and feel good about themselves.

Sober Living and Housing

Sober living homes often combine both recovery and independence. People living in these homes share the same goals and can work toward being responsible and sober together. There are both community responsibilities as well as opportunities to bond and grow. Learn more about our peaceful, sober-focused communities by calling us at 760-216-2077.

People who live with substance use disorder are more prone to developing an addiction that’s not drugs. There are many reasons that this can happen, and they all still come down to the disease of addiction.

What Kinds Of Behaviors Can Become Addictive?

Addiction involves both obsession and compulsion. Your brain and body craved alcohol or drugs before you got sober. It will recognize when an activity boosts feel-good chemicals such as serotonin. People who live with substance use disorder may be involved in activities that, while not healthy, feel hard to stop thinking about or doing.

These feelings are compulsive, like an addiction; when you do an activity or use a substance repeatedly, the brain's reward center will still be activated. You may follow your innate drive to “get more” of that feeling, leading to very unhealthy results.

Activities that can be compulsive or addictive:

  • Exercise
  • Bodybuilding
  • Binging/Purging food
  • Caffeine Consumption
  • Vaping/smoking cigarettes
  • Extreme sports
  • Working
  • Speeding
  • Shoplifting
  • Gambling
  • Sexual activity
  • Watching pornography

As you can see from the list, not all the activities that are addictive would be considered “bad” in moderation. Productive activities like work are great in moderation. But if your life surrounds your job, you may be throwing yourself into a whole new addiction cycle. Risk-taking behavior like speeding or skydiving also releases a lot of feel-good endorphins, which is why so many people engage in them.

Exercising once a day or every few days is healthy, but spending hours running or lifting weights could cause muscle injury and exhaustion. Drinking a cup of coffee once a day may be fine for your health, but if you find yourself living off of coffee, your health could be affected.

The Dangers Of New Addictions

When you become addicted to something besides substances, you’re in relapse mode. New addictions can bring back old behavior patterns, such as lying or minimizing your behavior. You may start to think there are other parts of recovery that you can cut corners from.

Lying about your addiction or falling into other old behavior patterns, such as minimizing your behavior, can be a trigger for relapse. Staying honest with yourself means reaching out when you realize your new addiction is a problem. You are powerless over your addiction, but you have the power to ask for help.

With a sponsor or therapist, you can start looking at your triggers and begin to abstain from compulsive behaviors. There are many healthier coping mechanisms that you can begin to do. Mindfulness, talk therapy, and meditation are just a few tools available.

You’re a human being, and you’re allowed to make mistakes. Don’t get high or drunk no matter what. Your recovery matters!

Consider Sober Living

Learning to live a sober lifestyle is an important part of your first steps in recovery! A sober living situation is often an excellent launchpad for people new to recovery. You can be around peers with similar goals as you begin to plot your next chapter of life. Learn more about sober housing by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Relapse is common for people early in recovery. Emotions are raw, new feelings and experiences may be intimidating, and some triggers may make people feel like using. It’s well known that addiction is common among people who have experienced trauma. When this trauma, such as early childhood abuse or sexual assault, goes unaddressed, it causes a wound that can affect a person’s entire life.

Unaddressed trauma is a well-known relapse trigger for people who struggle with a substance use disorder. It’s common for people in early recovery to have symptoms of anxiety, depression, or even PTSD when they get sober. Research shows that people who have been diagnosed with PTSD are more likely to relapse when they experience symptoms of the disorder.

Why Is Trauma A Relapse Trigger?

When you have experienced trauma, either in your childhood or as an adult, you probably adapted your life to survive. Some people shut down and go numb in the face of anxiety, while others self-medicate to make themselves feel numb. The emotions, physical sensations, and even dreams surrounding the trauma can make a person feel like they are reliving it repeatedly.

Newcomers to recovery feel a roller coaster of emotions during and after detox. These emotions may be related to things that happened today or long ago. Trauma, hurt, and shame often rears their head in people who live with PTSD. Angry and frightened outbursts can also occur occasionally when people feel like they’re in the grip of a traumatic situation again.

The intense emotions surrounding trauma can make a person want to do anything to escape their feelings, quickly leading to using their drug of choice again.

Working On Understanding Trauma

Trauma is something that people in the addiction profession watch for in addicted persons. Therapy, medication, if needed, and self-care are all important ways to begin healing from the pain of past trauma. In treatment and therapy, you will start new relationships and practice trusting yourself and others again.

Being reminded of trauma may make you feel shameful or afraid. Trauma is nothing to be ashamed of; if somebody hurt you or something happened to you, it’s not your fault. Acknowledging the pain and hurt is essential to recovery. Shame is a normal reaction, but as you will learn, feelings aren’t facts.

In recovery, you will learn to love yourself and feel comfortable in your skin again. Healing from the trauma of the past takes time and willingness. Treatment can offer a safe space for you to begin the healing journey. The journey starts with deciding to stay clean.

Staying clean will mean learning to love yourself again and working on healing your self-defeating thoughts and behaviors. Working through the trauma will help you understand how it affects you today. If you need help getting help for your trauma, reach out and ask.

Sober Living Options

Trauma-informed therapy and recovery can help you thrive even when you feel your past traumas are overwhelming.

Recovery is available to everyone! Sober living offers a safe, structured environment to continue your healing journey and focus on recovery. Learn more about what we offer by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Doctors prescribe many medications to help with mental health disorders, including anxiety disorders and PTSD. Some anxiety medications, however, are also highly addictive. People who become dependent on drugs like Xanax or Klonopin may develop a tolerance and need more medication to get the same effects. Some people who have taken these drugs long-term may end up abusing them.

Long-term use, and increased dosages, can create a physical dependence on the drug. A person with a substance use disorder may take larger amounts of the medication than prescribed. It's recommended that people with a substance use disorder steer clear of prescription anxiety medications that are also addictive.

Which Types of Prescription Anxiety Medications Are Addictive?

First of all, benzodiazepines, such as Xanax are highly addictive. Other drugs that are not prescribed as often for anxiety, such as sedatives like Valium, also have the potential for abuse or addiction. These classes of drugs, when taken in large amounts and stopped suddenly, can also cause withdrawal effects like fevers, shaking, or even seizures or heart palpitations.

Many people initially take the prescribed amount of a drug to get help with their anxiety. Drugs like benzos or sedatives can create peaceful or even euphoric feelings in the user. It’s not surprising that these effects can cause a person to take more than prescribed.

Anti-anxiety pills can help people cope with anxiety, but sometimes they become the only coping mechanism. They also stop working so well. Addiction to a drug can cause you to experience intense anxiety when you are in withdrawal. This can create a cycle of substance use that it feels hard to escape.

 

Alternative Methods For Coping With Anxiety

When a person quits using a benzo or sedative to help with their anxiety, there are other methods for treating their anxiety. Prescription drugs like Lexapro are helpful for anxiety and depression and do not cause any euphoric feelings. A psychiatrist is best qualified to help with medication changes. There are also therapy groups and methods such as mindfulness that can help you begin to work through anxiety.

Getting sober and no longer abusing substances will help you live with less anxiety. In treatment or 12-step groups, you’ll learn new coping skills. Therapy can help you learn more about your anxiety, cope with anxiety and begin to practice more healthy coping skills.

Stay Focused On Sober Living

Many people who want to stay sober find refuge in recovery communities like sober homes. In a sober living situation, you’ll be part of a group of peers on the recovery journey. Structure, camaraderie, and therapy can help you stay on course as you learn to live life substance-free.

Learn more about sober living by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Why do people who are sober have drug dreams? Many people in recovery from addiction discover that they dream more lucidly when sober for a while. However, one widespread phenomenon that sober people experience is dreams where they are using drugs again. These drug dreams can be frightening and disturbing. They can also bring up a desire to get high. All of the feelings you have about these types of dreams are valid. Learning about why you have dreams where you use drugs can help you walk through your fears and handle your feelings.

Drugs Were A Big Part Of Your Life

One reason you will have dreams about drugs is that when you have been addicted, you have spent a lot of time dedicated to your addiction. Getting and using your substance of choice was a priority. You spent a lot of time with your addiction. This time in your life doesn’t magically disappear, even when you have been sober for a while. No one knows precisely why we dream at all, but our dreams seem to depict fears and unresolved problems typically.

Even when you’re concentrating on being sober, you are still aware that you were once addicted to drugs. So your mind may bring it up to you every now and then.

Talking About Your Drug Dreams

Drug dreams are normal but can trigger many feelings to sort through. How do you feel when you wake up from a dream about getting high? Do you feel scared, angry, or upset? Remind yourself, first; it was just a dream. You can’t control your dreams, even if they make you feel guilty or upset.

Talking to your sponsor or therapist about dreams you have can be helpful. Some people like to keep dream journals to understand their dreams more thoroughly. However, making sure you talk about your feelings when you dream about substance use is essential.

One Day At A Time

Every day sober, you’re getting better, one day at a time. However, you may be going through an intense time in your recovery if you’re having recurring dreams about drugs. Don’t be afraid to seek professional help if these dreams are causing you regular anxiety or are interrupting your sleep. In addition, you can learn relaxation techniques that may help you dream more calmly.

Join A Recovery Home Community

Many people find that they’re interested in spending more time with others in recovery once they're sober. Sober living homes offer community and lifestyle for newly sober people. While there is structure, there is also freedom and assistance while you work your recovery program a day at a time.

Learn more about what our sober living programs have to offer at 760-216-2077.

Addiction is a problem throughout the country, and California is no exception. Much of the focus around the country has been placed on fentanyl use. After all, fentanyl overdoses outrank all other drug addiction deaths. However, meth addiction has been rising steadily in the past several years. As a result, overdoses have been increasing as well.

Meth’s Growing Popularity

Pop culture such as the popular show Breaking Bad has helped glorify meth use even as it portrayed characters stuck in horrific cycles of addiction. As pop culture brought a resurgence of popularity to meth, cartels have created more pure products as a result. This has made meth more addictive and more likely to cause an overdose.

According to the California Overdose Dashboard, deaths from illicit psychostimulants such as methamphetamine increased more than 250 percent between 2008 and 2015. California is, after all, a popular state to traffic drugs through. The Central Valley is considered one of the most active meth markets in the US. Some of the meth is manufactured in California, but now it is often more likely to have been made in Mexico and distributed through trafficking networks.

Meth and Fentanyl: A Fatal Combination

Drug dealers often use fentanyl as an adulterant to other drugs to make it more addictive or more potent. For inexperienced opioid users, this can be a fatal decision. It’s caused people to overdose on drugs like meth or cocaine more often. Combining uppers with downers is also more likely to cause a heart attack.

Many people who take meth with fentanyl don’t know that they’re doing it. However, some meth users also use other hard drugs like heroin or fentanyl.

Many harm reduction proponents recommend all drugs users consider acquiring Naloxone, an opioid reversal drug. Some people even use fentanyl testing strips to test for the presence of fentanyl in other drugs.

Help With Sober Living

Are you or somebody you love looking for a living situation that helps you stay sober? We can help! Our sober living homes offer structure, safety, recovery, and community. Get in touch to learn more about how we can help at 760-216-2077.

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