Fentanyl and Medication-Assisted Treatment

friends talking MAT and fentanyl

Medication-Assisted Treatment is considered the gold standard of treatment for opioid use disorder. Experts say the medication, alongside appropriate treatment, and peer support groups is backed by science. MAT can help individuals begin to live substance-free while quelling withdrawal symptoms and cravings. But how well does it work for people who use fentanyl, a drug that is 50 to 100 times the potency of morphine?

Opioid Use Disorder and Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a highly potent drug that is typically used by experienced drug users. Many people who are exposed to drugs in a medical setting end up misusing them. Some people misuse prescription drugs after surgery. Others start out with recreational opioid use, such as OxyContin pills sold online or on the street. Eventually, addiction becomes costly, and people may move up to more potent drugs. Many people who use heroin, Oxycontin and other opioids decide to try fentanyl, a much more potent drug.

Fentanyl addiction is dangerous and deadly. People can quickly become physically addicted, experiencing intense withdrawal symptoms if they cannot use an opioid. Withdrawal is the top reason many people resist getting sober from opioids. People who use fentanyl will have stronger withdrawal symptoms than those using a less potent drug.

Deciding on MAT Dosage For Fentanyl Users

When a person gets sober from opioids and enters a detox program, they are assessed by a clinician for detox symptoms.  Yes, MAT can be successful for people addicted to higher-dose opioids.  People who have used high doses of drugs such as heroin have still found relief and freedom from cravings using treatment drugs such as methadone, Suboxone or Naltrexone.

A doctor or nurse practitioner will help administer MAT and assess a patient for symptoms after they’ve been sober for 24 hours. There may need to be adjustments to the initial dose. All dosage decisions are made between the healthcare provider and the patient. Some patients will stay on MAT for the duration of their inpatient treatment. Others will stay on it indefinitely. The CDC has said MAT is safe to use for years. For this reason, most sober housing programs treat MAT like they do most medications.

Sober Housing and MAT

People who are sober and meet the requirements of sober housing programs often are on medication. MAT isn’t a big deal; programs are more about focusing on recovery. If you’re interested in sober housing, our program offers community, safety, and recovery in a serene and vibrant environment. Give us a

Many people who decide to get sober use tools like Medication-Assisted Treatment to reduce withdrawal symptoms and help them focus on their recovery. Sublocade is a Medication-Assisted Treatment option many people prefer because it’s only administered once a month. It is prescribed and administered by medical professionals for people with opioid use disorder who want to stay sober.

What Is Sublocade?

Sublocade contains the drug buprenorphine and is administered monthly in a medical provider’s office. For many people, it’s a safe and responsible way to go about their lives while getting relief from withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings.

Sublocade works best when the person taking it also gets counseling via drug treatment or one-on-one therapy. This can help newly sober people gain insight into themselves and understand their addiction. Opioid use disorder is manageable, but Medication-Assisted treatment is only part of managing it. Getting therapy can also help somebody learn new coping skills and learn to live a more authentic, happy life drug-free.

How Often Is Sublocade Needed?

People prescribed Sublocade need to get the injection monthly in a healthcare provider’s office. Most treatment providers will start patients with a 300mg dosage and eventually will be weaned down to a lower dose, usually 100mg. Some people will stay on 300mg longer if their healthcare provider deems it necessary.

People can use Sublocade as MAT for as long as the doctor approves. Some people will get an injection for months, while others may need to stay on it for years.

Sublocade Injections Increase Sobriety Success Rates

According to the manufacturer, in one clinical study, people treated with Sublocade were fourteen times more likely to complete their treatment programs and stay sober. 28% of people who got therapy/treatment alongside their MAT stayed sober for at least 24 months.

In the study, the group that was given a placebo only had a 3% success rate over the same period. While some people did relapse in the more successful group, everyone who stayed sober for at least 80% of those 24 months did so with the help of Sublocade.

Consider Sober Living

If you or somebody you love needs a safe space to lay their head, sober living may be the healthiest choice. Living in an environment where people work toward positive change can be inspiring and help you stay focused on your goals. Learn more about our communities by calling us at 760-216-2077.

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