Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Addiction Recovery

cognitive behavioral therapy for addiction

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a popular type of therapy that most recovery centers and rehabs incorporate into their treatment programs. CBT helps people change their thoughts and behaviors to become healthier and happier in recovery.

People with substance use disorder and other mental health disorders can benefit from CBT. So many actions and reactions come from our thoughts and emotions. By becoming more aware of how beliefs influence their feelings, behaviors, and reactions, a person can also begin the process of trying new things to cope with them. CBT can also help people understand how their thoughts and feelings keep them in a cycle of addiction.

Why Change Your Thoughts With CBT?

Cognitive behavioral therapy can help you recognize negative thought processes that may hold you back from change. Usually, these thoughts are centered on certain beliefs you have about yourself. They may even go back to childhood or something somebody once said about you. By examining these thoughts, you learn that you can challenge them.

CBT can help you address problematic thoughts and feelings to overcome addiction. Many people have triggers to use, such as feeling angry or anxious. In recovery, people learn how to cope with these feelings and override the desire to get high or drunk. They replace those thoughts and behaviors with something more positive.

Addiction treatment programs are known for helping people change their perspective, attitude, and behavior to start a new way of life. But CBT helps people without addictions, too. People with PTSD, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, and other mental health disorders can benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. Some people go to therapy to help them with specific behaviors or get through life changes like a divorce.

Anyone that needs help changing their life for the better can benefit from CBT.

How Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work?

As human beings, our behavior is connected with our beliefs about ourselves and the world we inhabit. CBT helps people examine how their thoughts are related to their behavior. People addicted to drugs act differently when in the throes of addiction. Thought processes were centered on using drugs. After using, a person may have felt guilty or inadequate.

Therapists can help people examine how their thoughts and feelings contributed to their addictive behavior. Many people have self-defeating thoughts that lead to behavior they later regret.

By using CBT, addicted people learn how to identify and counter their negative thoughts with more positive outcomes. With time and practice, people learn to overcome obstacles and stay sober, making better decisions in their daily lives.

Considering Sober Living?

Are you looking for a safe, structured community with other people in recovery? Many people go to a sober living home while they continue their recovery journey. Learn more about our programs by calling at 760-216-2077.

 

 

Many people live in recovery-centered communities as a part of their recovery journey. Some people experience the community approach to recovery at inpatient drug treatment. Many people also choose a community approach to their recovery by living in sober housing. People who live in a sober living community are also part of a therapeutic community with a focus on community and healing. Sober living, based on the community model of treatment, is a great option for your recovery journey.

Why Community-Centered Treatment? How Does It Help?

The community treatment model works on helping people change in a communal setting. The environment in sober living homes focuses on recovery and positive change. Being around others with similar focus and goals can help people stay sober.

Community members are encouraged to practice honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness. Participating in a recovery community means taking responsibility for yourself and your recovery. Sometimes this means hard work, but as you continue to grow in the program, you’re given more freedom and responsibility.

Recovery work, therapy, and MAT may be a part of your treatment. However, everyone in the community will have their own specific goals and issues to work on. You will learn to live in harmony with a sober lifestyle.

What Do People In A Sober Living Community Do With Their Time?

Most community members attend 12-step meetings, have group therapy, and go out together. Some people will take to the beach or road to surf or jog. There will usually be shared chores that are alternated weekly or monthly. Grocery shopping and cooking are often communal.

Therapy and 12-step groups will be a big part of sober living. After all, staying sober comes before everything else.

The goal for a person in sober living is to use the tools they’ve acquired to continue to stay sober, reclaim their lives, and take on more responsibilities. Some people start to resolve wreckage from the past, such as missed court appearances, old speeding tickets, or charged-off credit cards. Making amends and doing the right thing are important goals to work towards.

For some participants, this means getting a part-time job or a job training program. Moving towards independence and becoming ready to move forward is a part of recovery in this stage.

Becoming Stronger Together With A Community

For many people in sober living communities, having the support of peers is vital. Active participation in group activities helps people inspire each other and continue to move towards their recovery goals.

A recovery community emphasizes group learning and peer support. People come together to rally around community members who are struggling. They also offer support to each other regularly. People in sober living homes find a family-like community where they come together, no matter their flaws, to become better people. Everyone’s goal is

Being supportive is an essential part of growing in recovery. A recovery community is a great place to practice empathy, build coping skills, and learn how to have healthier relationships. Feeling at home in a recovery community helps keep people sober, helps them practice coping skills, and helps with relapse prevention.

Learn About Sober Living Options

If you or somebody you love is looking for a recovery community, our sober housing program may suit you. Give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn more about our communities.

 

Addiction Is a treatable disease, and trust-building with loved ones is integral to the healing process. For some couples, it makes sense to seek couples therapy and strengthen their relationship. Couples therapy offers a space and time for romantic partners to work on their issues with a facilitator.

People who struggle with substance use disorder often have trouble in their relationships. After all, addiction is a disease of the brain. As a person becomes dependent on a substance, the way they act and think may change. The brain is focused on making its reward system happy rather than being a reasonable and responsible family member.

Why Couples Therapy?

Addiction is a disease that can leave much damage in its wake. It’s hard for partners and other loved ones to watch as somebody spirals out of control. They may try to help their partner only to be “shut out” or lied to.

Addiction is a family disease, and everyone in the addicted person’s life is affected by it. For some families, many false notions of stigma are still attached to the idea of addiction. People may be hurt or overwhelmed when their loved one admits there’s a problem.

Families, love, and emotions are complex. Addiction recovery helps the addicted person begin to rebuild their lives and stay sober. Therapy helps everyone adjust to the new changes and find ways to build trust together. A therapist can help facilitate difficult conversations about commitment, fears, sadness, anger, and past hurts that must be addressed.

Addiction Education In Couple’s Therapy

It’s essential to seek out a therapist that understands and works with families who live with a person with substance use issues. Many treatment centers and sober living communities have access to therapy for couples to work together.

Educating family members is also a big part of family therapy. Understanding that addiction is a disease of the brain, but it’s treatable is essential. Families need education about addiction's physical, mental, and emotional effects. They also need to learn more about recovery in general.

Couples may have experienced financial issues, job loss, arrests, and other wreckage. Sorting through and acknowledging the hurt with a professional can help couples build a healthier relationships.

Consider A Sober Living Community Post-Treatment

For many people, even married couples, treatment is just the beginning of a long journey toward long-term sobriety. After treatment, a sober living home can offer the community and support structure to start living life in early recovery. Learn more about your housing options by contacting us at 760-216-2077.

Educational family therapy, sometimes called psychoeducation, is a type of therapy that involves members of an individual’s family. The therapy helps provide information and education on drug detox, treatment, and other aspects of recovery. Sometimes this type of therapy involves both the client and their family, as well as other peers and family members. Educational family therapy is an essential component of drug treatment for dual-diagnosed people, meaning they live with both a mental health disorder and a substance use disorder.

Why Is Educational Family Therapy Important?

Family is a big part of healing for many people in recovery. Family can play a supportive role for people in recovery. Without help, they may feel discouraged by their family members. Some family members may enable an addicted person, while others may over-criticize or try to take control of the person’s recovery. These situations are often emotionally charged. They can lead to conflict when there are communication problems. Therefore treatment centers often want to involve family members in therapy to educate them about their loved one’s disease.

Family psychoeducation is an essential service that treatment providers can facilitate. Through education and talk sessions, knowledge of addiction can help family members understand substance use disorder more clearly. Family members may also need to be educated about co-occurring conditions such as PTSD symptoms.

Educational therapy can help increase the family’s awareness of substance-use risk factors, symptoms of a substance use disorder, treatment options, and other recovery-affirming options for their loved one.

Many people who get sober do so with the support of their families. While this is not an option for everyone, when the family wants to be involved, they can help individuals make better decisions about their recovery.

More Awareness and Compliance in Recovery

For many people, a family can help keep them on task. After all, not everyone is aware of a recovering person’s schedule unless they are told about it. Knowing a person’s schedule and needs can help family members keep their loved ones on task.

Something as simple as having the family keep a calendar with the times and dates visible can help clients and their families to understand the obligations a person in recovery has. They’re working on themselves, after all. But sometimes, family members don’t know unless they are told about all the moving parts in a loved one’s recovery program.

Some family group sessions also use problem-solving to address dysfunction or negative dynamics among family members. The goal is for the family to be able to provide ongoing support and monitoring, with particular awareness of their loved ones’ needs and responsibilities in early recovery.

Bringing families together to support each other in a larger group can be a powerful experience. When peers and their families get together, they have a wealth of knowledge, strength, and hope to share. Ultimately, these types of support groups can help create a network that continues to keep in touch and support each other even once treatment has been completed.

About By the Sea Recovery

We offer safe, structured community homes with the highest sober living standards. Living in a house with a sober living culture can help you or your loved one build a strong foundation as they start their recovery journey.

Many people find comfort and community in a group setting focused on sober living. Learn more about your options and how our programs work by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Relapse is common for people early in recovery. Emotions are raw, new feelings and experiences may be intimidating, and some triggers may make people feel like using. It’s well known that addiction is common among people who have experienced trauma. When this trauma, such as early childhood abuse or sexual assault, goes unaddressed, it causes a wound that can affect a person’s entire life.

Unaddressed trauma is a well-known relapse trigger for people who struggle with a substance use disorder. It’s common for people in early recovery to have symptoms of anxiety, depression, or even PTSD when they get sober. Research shows that people who have been diagnosed with PTSD are more likely to relapse when they experience symptoms of the disorder.

Why Is Trauma A Relapse Trigger?

When you have experienced trauma, either in your childhood or as an adult, you probably adapted your life to survive. Some people shut down and go numb in the face of anxiety, while others self-medicate to make themselves feel numb. The emotions, physical sensations, and even dreams surrounding the trauma can make a person feel like they are reliving it repeatedly.

Newcomers to recovery feel a roller coaster of emotions during and after detox. These emotions may be related to things that happened today or long ago. Trauma, hurt, and shame often rears their head in people who live with PTSD. Angry and frightened outbursts can also occur occasionally when people feel like they’re in the grip of a traumatic situation again.

The intense emotions surrounding trauma can make a person want to do anything to escape their feelings, quickly leading to using their drug of choice again.

Working On Understanding Trauma

Trauma is something that people in the addiction profession watch for in addicted persons. Therapy, medication, if needed, and self-care are all important ways to begin healing from the pain of past trauma. In treatment and therapy, you will start new relationships and practice trusting yourself and others again.

Being reminded of trauma may make you feel shameful or afraid. Trauma is nothing to be ashamed of; if somebody hurt you or something happened to you, it’s not your fault. Acknowledging the pain and hurt is essential to recovery. Shame is a normal reaction, but as you will learn, feelings aren’t facts.

In recovery, you will learn to love yourself and feel comfortable in your skin again. Healing from the trauma of the past takes time and willingness. Treatment can offer a safe space for you to begin the healing journey. The journey starts with deciding to stay clean.

Staying clean will mean learning to love yourself again and working on healing your self-defeating thoughts and behaviors. Working through the trauma will help you understand how it affects you today. If you need help getting help for your trauma, reach out and ask.

Sober Living Options

Trauma-informed therapy and recovery can help you thrive even when you feel your past traumas are overwhelming.

Recovery is available to everyone! Sober living offers a safe, structured environment to continue your healing journey and focus on recovery. Learn more about what we offer by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Many people who go to drug treatment have experience with a lot of types of therapy. However, one type of therapy that doesn’t solely focus on you is family therapy, which can be an important component of recovery. Your family members, after all, are a part of your addiction. Children are significantly affected by addiction in the family.

Family Therapy Focuses on Healing for All

Family therapy helps the people that love you learn to live with the “new” you. It’s also a way for your family to learn new coping methods and behaviors. People who enable you need to learn new coping mechanisms. They also need to have healthy boundaries with you.

Many people who are addicted to something have a family enabler. Did somebody always bail you out of jail or pay your utilities? Well, that person needs to heal too. They have given a lot of their time and life to your addiction. They may feel strange and even scared when you get sober. They may have expectations that you don’t know about or even resent your new friends or lifestyle.

Your child or spouse may have trust issues or fears surrounding your addition. Going to therapy as a family can help you learn what effect addiction has had on them, what they need from you now that you're sober, and how to repair those relationships.

Why Go To Family Therapy?

You may think that recovery is about you and your growth alone, but that is a selfish view. Your actions always affect more than one person.

Addiction is a family disease. You’re not responsible for the disease, but you are responsible for your recovery. Relationships can recover when you put in the work. People who love you may have been manipulated, stolen from, or verbally abused during your active addiction. That kind of behavior has a lasting effect on relationships, and it’s up to you to begin to make up for it and mend the trust. It can happen, and it takes willingness and time. A therapist can help you figure things out.

The goal of family therapy is to help people with their relationships and help repair wounds. When substance use disorder is part of a family dynamic, there are many wounds. The therapist and your family will talk about their perspectives and emotions.

Consider Sober Housing

Sober housing can be a vital springboard from treatment to everyday living. In a structured environment, you can begin to become more responsible as you focus on your recovery. If you’re not ready to go home after treatment, consider a sober living residence. You’ll have community and structure as you begin to rebuild your life in recovery.

Call us at 760-216-2077 to learn more about how we can help.

If you are planning on getting sober, there are probably many things you have questions about. You may wonder why you can’t simply get the drugs out of your system and get on with your life. Unfortunately, addiction doesn’t work like that. To stay sober once you’ve rid your body of substances, you’re going to need some help. There are going to be changes you need to make in life to maintain your recovery. That’s where therapy can help you make choices about your recovery.

Detox and Therapy

Most people who are addicted to a substance need help to get sober. Your body and brain have been used to getting a certain amount of a substance every day. Because of this, you probably will experience some withdrawal effects. Detox is a safe and comfortable place that can help you through the challenges of your first few days or week clean and sober.

While you’re in detox, you’ll have the chance to go to group sessions and speak with counselors. You’ll be able to plan your next moves in recovery. For example, you may want to go to an inpatient program or try sober housing. You must get help from addiction professionals to help you find the right treatment plan to fit your needs.

Much of your first days sober will be an emotional roller coaster as your body and brain adjust to life without drugs. This is normal, and will pass after a week or so.

Therapy for Recovery and Healing

Once you’ve been sober for a few more weeks, you’ll probably be in another group setting. Group therapy is important because it allows you to learn more about yourself in a room of peers. You’re able to offer both your support and insight as somebody with similar experiences. You can also benefit from the insight from your peers and trained professionals.

One-on-one therapy in recovery can help you work through more personal issues. A therapist can help you learn how to cope with challenges in your life. They can also help you learn to cope with painful situations and problems as they come up in life.

Most treatment centers will help you by engaging in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which enables you to change your actions and reactions. You’ll learn more about yourself and how to live life on its terms as you develop a relationship with a therapist.

AA, NA, and Other 12 Step Meetings

Twelve-step meetings like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous aren’t technically therapy, but they are a support group full of people who want to stay sober. Some of them have experience from years of sobriety, while others are new, just like you.

Twelve-step meetings are a place to meet others and learn what has helped them achieve long-term sobriety. They also offer fellowship and friendship if you go to them regularly. Most people in recovery make 12-step meetings a part of their daily life. The community can help you through thick and thin.

If you need help with a mental health disorder or substance use disorder, support is available! Seeking out a professional therapist, treatment program, or doctor to help you get sober is an important first step!

You deserve to reclaim your life!

Getting Help for Addiction

Are you looking for a sober living program? Our programs will help you get sober and plot your next step in your recovery journey. We offer a safe space for you to begin to heal and start your journey. Give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn more about your opeions.

 

People coming from inpatient facilities often feel overwhelmed when returning to the “real world.” After all, treatment was a safe, quiet space where the addicted person was able to focus on their addiction, personal triggers, and other issues and learn to live without drugs and alcohol. Returning to everyday life can be jarring. Many people in recovery choose aftercare programs to help them adjust to their new life.

What Kind of Aftercare Programs Are Available?

Aftercare, like recovery, is built to help meet your needs. You have choices that can help you continue the building blocks of recovery. These include:

  • Sober living homes. These homes are structured and allow you to hold a job, attend outside therapy, and bond with others working toward the same goals. There are rules, but it’s not the same as inpatient treatment. You will probably have chores and other duties as they fit within your schedule.
  • Treatment center aftercare. Many treatment centers offer outpatient therapy to people who have completed their inpatient programs. Sometimes this is group therapy, but other options can include family therapy or individual therapy.
  • 12-step groups. Continuing to work your recovery program is the most important thing to do when you’ve graduated from treatment. You can’t do it alone, and 12-step programs are free, available, and highly effective. Most people who continue to use 12-step support groups after treatment can achieve long-term sobriety, even through life’s most challenging events.

 

Aftercare Helps You Stay Focused

Post-treatment life can be stressful and distracting from your recovery goals. Aftercare helps you continue to build new coping mechanisms. You’ll still be able to connect with peers, and you’ll be able to delve into deeper issues when the need arises.

Having a plan for staying sober after you finish your drug rehab is essential. You’ll need all the support you can get. Going to 12-step programs, working with a sponsor, and learning to live daily clean and sober are the bare essentials of continued growth in recovery. Other tools, like a sober living home, can give you the extra support you need as you start over in the world, free from alcohol and other drugs.

Interested in Sober Living?

Sober living is a great way to focus on your recovery as you begin to reclaim your life after treatment. You’ll make new friends, learn more about yourself, and have the comfort of living in a safe and sober environment. Learn more about your options by giving us a call at 760-216-2077.

With psychedelic induced therapies become more evident as well as researched, there is a controversial rebirth of interest to its attending PTSD as well as other mental health disorders. The substance use disorder field seems to push backwards, with strong sentiments against the abstinence based mindset overheard from 12 step programs. What are your thoughts and experience? I personally have seen youth recovery from substance use disorders being open to trying it as a detox and have rarely seen that interest in regular treatment. It seems to be uncovering an element of willingness, and the variable is one that seems more looking into. All comments are highly appreciated for we cannot stand with a mindset of 'We know it all' or 'This is how it is", with an epidemic running rampant and a need for all best practices to be shared and research to show what the true underlying variables to recovery are.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/can-acid-trips-cure-ptsd-and-other-maladies/2014/11/17/3eaeb59a-5ded-11e4-8b9e-2ccdac31a031_story.html

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