Dreams About Drugs: What Do They Mean?

man sleeping having dreams

All humans who get quality sleep remember their dreams from time to time. For people new to recovery, dreams can be pretty intense and vivid. As your body adjusts to life without substances, you may have a lot more dreams than usual or remember them more clearly. Some people can describe in vivid detail dreams where they feel panic, loss, or fear. For people with addiction, common themes are relapsing or using their substance of choice.

Dreams like these can be startling, so it’s important to understand what these dreams mean and how to respond to them.

Why Are You Having Dreams About Using Substances?

If you’re dreaming about getting high or drinking while in recovery from a substance use disorder, it’s important to know that it’s perfectly normal. Of course, dreaming about your substance of choice will make you feel uncomfortable. Remember, yes, you’re sober now.

Addiction and getting high or drunk was once a big part of your life. So big that these activities basically took over. It’s normal to dream about these situations because many dreams are built on memories of people, places, and things.

Your mind may also be trying to work through emotions that have to do with your addiction. After all, experts say that our dreams have a lot to do with problem-solving, even if they distress us. Your mind is aware that you want to stay sober, but may feel you struggling with that desire sometimes.

When Drug Dreams Are A Trigger to Use

If you dream that you used your substance of choice, you may wake up with a craving or feel triggered to use. This feeling can be scary, but if it happens, it’s time to go through the tools you’ve learned. Give your sponsor a call or send them a text. Or get straight to a 12-step meeting.  If you feel triggered to use, you have a choice today. Just remember, this too shall pass. Keep doing the next right thing, and you can stay sober.

It’s normal to have a craving, dream, or intense feeling related to substance use every once in a while. However, you don’t have to act on it. Instead, work the steps and reach out to your network if you’re feeling vulnerable.

Consider Sober Living

Many people new to recovery find that sober living helps them branch out in recovery while beginning to reclaim independence. In addition, a sober living situation can help you by providing community and a shared sense of purpose.

Are you interested in learning more about your sober living options? Give us a call at 760-216-2077, and we’re happy to help answer any questions.

Many people who get sober did so in the beginning because of legal troubles. The courts often sentence people with a DUI to 12-step meetings, drug education, fine and/or rehab. Not everyone who gets a DUI will change their ways. If you are sick and tired of the consequences of your alcohol use, you are more likely to seek recovery.

Once you have been sober for a while, you'll start to look forward to the future again. Drug treatment, therapy, and 12-step meetings provide you with a new strategy for life. However, even once you have completed rehab, you will still have to live with the consequences of your addiction. And if you have a DUI, you will also need to do what the government asks to comply with your probation.

Living With Humility After DUI

One thing that living with a DUI conviction can teach you is humility. Yes, you are sober now, but the consequences of your alcohol and/or drug use are apparent every day. Staying sober is the only way to avoid getting a DUI or drunk-in-public charge. And that makes the future up to you!

Being humble, asking for help, and doing what the court requires are critical aspects of your life in recovery. You're responsible for the damages you've caused and the laws you've broken. As a responsible member of society, it's up to you to accept this and do what is required to regain others' trust.

Dealing With The DUI Aftermath

Recovery is full of ups and downs. After you've completed the bulk of your treatment program, you may feel different and healthier. However, you can't expect family, friends, and society to believe you have changed without proof. It will take time to grow your relationships and regain trust. Taking responsibility is an essential aspect of this.

After a DUI, you will probably be on probation and have conditions to meet before you are allowed to get your driver's license back. If it were your first DUI, you'd be without your license for six months. Subsequent DUI's and offenses combined with it (such as a controlled substance or aggravated DUI), will cause you to lose your license for longer.

Go to the meetings your probation officer requires. Call when you are supposed to. Check-in with your sponsor and work on your recovery program.

Living Life On Its Terms

While it may be a challenge to deal with these consequences, they are YOUR consequences. If you owe fines, it's up to you to find a way to pay them. (And if your family pays them for you, it's your job to pay them back, no matter what!)

While you may feel like your DUI has held you back from some things in life, this too shall pass. In some cases, you may even be able to get a DUI expunged from your record.

Getting where you need to go is one logistic you'll need to overcome in recovery. It will be humbling to ask for rides or take Uber rides for long distances. However, you can also get along fine in the California weather without a car at all. Skateboard, jog, or bike wherever you choose once you're out of rehab. AA meetings and NA meetings are currently online due to COVID-19.

Ask for help when you need it, and keep doing the right thing for your recovery! Time will make all the difference. One thing for sure: You'll never get another DUI as long as you stay alcohol and drug-free.

Consider Sober Living

Are you looking for a safe and friendly sober living home? By the Sea is a great community to support your sobriety, with lots of public transportation nearby and centrally located to lots of jobs and schools. Read about how our sober living home supports DUI offenders here.

The support of others in your household can help you learn to live life on its own terms. Learn more about the benefits of sober living by getting in touch at 760-216-2077.

 

As society realizes that alcoholism and addiction is an epidemic, more efforts to attend them locally such as these will be a sign of care and acceptance that an illness is not discriminating of socioeconomic conditions nor geography. Thank you Vineyard House.
http://www.mvtimes.com/2014/12/22/marthas-vineyard-new-sober-living-facility/

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