What Are Some Healthy Coping Skills?

mental health coping skills

For people in recovery, coping skills can be a significant challenge. Unfortunately, when you were in active addiction, these skills may have been in short supply.

After all, when you were sad, you probably got high or drunk. When you were angry, you probably got high or drunk. When you felt lonely, happy, confused, or lost…you probably got high or drunk, if it was an option. When you get sober, you learn that you don’t have the best coping skills. Discovering new ones will be a lifelong process. But there are some you can try on for size right away. So what are some good ones to practice?

New Coping Skills To Try On For Size

Not every coping skill works for every emotion. Here are some ones to try on for size. If they don’t work for you, you can always try another one, instead. Keep what you need and leave the rest.

  • When you’re angry: Go for a walk or a jog. If you don’t like that type of exercise, choose something like bicycling, surfing, or shadowboxing. Exercise can release calming hormones that also provide a mood boost.
  • When you’re sad: Permit yourself to cry. Then, listen to sad music for 10 minutes, and let it all out. Or, pick up the phone and call somebody in your recovery network to talk it out.
  • When you’re lonely: Send somebody a text message or get yourself to a 12-step meeting, pronto. People are the cure for loneliness. Yes, you can feel lonely in a room full of people. But, if you share that pain, it often is lessened.
  • When you’re happy/excited/proud: Believe it or not, your coping skills for celebrating may not be the best! Many people use good news as a reason to use substances. Instead, make a date with a friend or your sponsor to go out for ice cream. Share your good news with friends in recovery. Happiness multiplies when it’s shared.
  • When you feel like getting high/drunk: Call somebody who doesn’t, and make arrangements to get to a 12-step meeting. Share about how you feel, don’t hold it inside. The feeling will pass, but keeping it secret can be dangerous to your mental health.

Consider Sober Living

Are you or somebody you love interested in a living situation that offers structure and aftercare? Sober living may be the right decision for you. Learn more about your options by calling us at 760-216-2077.

With all of the focus on health and wellness in the world today, people have begun to take their mental health seriously. Your mental health is also very much a part of living a life of recovery. As you stay sober, you’ll notice certain problems that hold you back in life and cause you mental stress. Maybe you also struggle with a mental health disorder such as depression or anxiety. Whatever your mental health situation, it’s important to do your best to take care of yourself. The goal of recovery is a better life. Being at your best, mentally, will help you through your new journeys.

Gut Health, the Body, and Mental Health

Scientists have only recently studied the effect of food on the body, but one promising new study found that probiotics can be a part of that. A research study analyzed “gut health” and the microbial universe within your stomach walls and its relationship to mood. The releationship isn’t super clear, but studies have shown that when people take probiotic supplements with “good bacteria” in them, they experience significant changes in their mental state. Probiotics seemed to help rid their anxiety levels and stress levels. Study participants given probiotics also had their attitudes improve.

So where can you get probiotics?  There are nutritional supplements available, but the prices and quality will probably vary a lot. However, many people get their probiotics from yogurt and their vegan counterparts.

Healthier Food Can Help With Mental Health

Studies also show that nutrient-rich food can help improve moods. In fact, science has shown that carbohydrates are linked to the mood-boosting brain chemical, serotonin. While the jury is still out on the evidence, experts agree that carb cravings could be related to low serotonin activity.

Healthier carbs, such as brown rice, beans/legumes, salads, and even fruit, can help the body function better and add antioxidants to your diet, which can help fight cell damage (which many people who fight addiction may have.)

Healthy protein choices such as tuna or chicken also  contain an acid called tryptophan, which can help your body regulate seratonin. Having enough protein is important for skin, nails, muscles, and hair. So even if you’re vegan, please try to eat something with protein several times a day. It will help you boost your energy and build a strong body.

Consider Sober Living

Many people live in sober living environments because they want to focus on themselves and their recovery. Is sober living right for you? Give us a call to learn more about our programs and if they fir your needs. Call us at 76-216-2077.

Many people in recovery, especially when they first get clean, feel depressed, lonely or “down” every once in a while. A person with addiction has a lot of loss to mourn when they first clean. If you’re afraid, angry, or sad, you’re not alone. Depression is also something you may experience as you gain your footing in your new life in recovery.

What’s Normal, and What’s Not?

Feeling sad or depressed is normal for many people, especially when you’re first getting clean. Many of the emotions that you feel are normal and will pass as you start to process them. You may feel like you’re in mourning for your old life. That’s normal, too. Many people grieve their own lives but start to feel better once they begin to rebuild their life in recovery.

Working the 12 steps, going to meetings, and making friends with other people in recovery will help you learn to work through your emotions. Sharing your feelings with others will often help you lessen their impact.

Feeling sad, let down, or blue is one of these feelings. You may feel like you’re holding on by a thread some days, while other days you’re full of hope and energy. In most cases, these feelings will pass. You’ll experience many emotions when you’re clean and sober, and learn how to cope with them.

If you wake up depressed and go to bed depressed, for weeks on end, there may be something else going on. Depression can also be a symptom of a mental health disorder. If you feel like hurting yourself, wish you were dead, or have other deep, sad feelings that seem like they’ve been going on forever, it’s time to get help. Any depressive symptoms that seem to stop you from working on goals, or make you feel hopeless are warning signs that you need to get help.

Getting Help for Depression

Getting help for depression is important. Depression can be a disease, and like any disease, especially addiction, the only way to get better is to seek out help. If you’re comfortable, ask people in your support group to help you. A psychiatrist, therapist, or treatment professional can help you with resources. Like all of recovery, you’re not alone. There are many people in recovery who are also recovering from a mental disorder.

Remember that in recovery, you’re never alone.

Sober Living Can Help

If you’re struggling with a mental health disorder, or just want extra support, sober housing is an option many people choose to help make the transition to life without the use of drugs.

Sober housing is a great way to make new friends and start adding inspiration and empowerment to your life. Learn more about your options for serene sober living at 760-216-2077.

Exercise is a powerful tool that anyone can use to help improve their lives. It can help improve your mood and regulate your blood pressure.

When you were using drugs, you may have gotten some exercise. Getting, finding and using drugs and alcohol sometimes means spending some time on your feet.

Once you’ve been clean and sober for a while, you’ll notice some subtle changes in your life. You may feel more confident or upbeat. Or, you may feel more depressive or anxious without the drugs you used to use when you wanted to self-medicate.

Exercise and Depression

Studies show that exercise is a powerful tool for people that suffer from depressive symptoms. For some people who are moderately depressed, exercise is enough to help alleviate their symptoms.

Many people with depression either have trouble sleeping or sleep too much. Exercise can help you sleep more soundly at night and even help you with a boost of energy. People who suffer from severe depression usually require medication and talk therapy. Exercise can be a form of self-care when you’re feeling up to it. Joining a walking group, going surfing, going for a hike or bike ride are all ways to make exercise a part of your regular life.

Exercise and Anxiety

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America says that nearly 40% of Americans have anxiety disorders. Many people in recovery have experienced trauma or have been diagnosed with mental health disorders such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Exercise can help with anxiety in a few ways. Exercise releases endorphins, the feel-good hormone that the body makes naturally. Walking is a way to practice mindfulness or deep breathing. Surfing may make you feel closer to your spiritual side. These are all benefits of exercise in recovery.

If you’re angry, anxious, or depressed, please try a walk. Just 15 minutes a day can make a difference in your health and your mood. Give yourself a chance to use this powerful recovery tool.

Looking for Sober Housing?

We can help. By the Sea Recovery homes are supervised, structured environment that help men who are recovering from addiction transition to the next phase of their recovery journey. Please give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn more about our housing.

Staying positive in recovery can seem like a battle, at least when you first get clean and begin to sift through your emotions. Negative self-talk can be harmful to you and hinder your progress in sobriety. Learning to become more positive will help you achieve more of your goals, build your self-esteem, and stay on track in your new way of life.

 

What is Negative Self-Talk?

Let’s face it, we all have an internal voice that tells us things about ourselves, whether they are true or not. Many of these things are negative, and nowhere close to reality. For example, some people call themselves stupid over the tiniest thing, like dropping a plate or missing a bus. Mistakes can sometimes seem like astronomical problems when your internal voice is so negative. When we do this, it’s called “negative self-talk”. It can be a huge issue for those in recovery.

These negative self-beliefs can be dangerous and cause failure because you’re continually looking at the negative, and are also telling yourself that you are meant to fail.

What does negative talk sound like? Here are a few things people tell themselves that can get in the way of recovery:

 

  • “I'm so stupid."
  • "I'll never be good at _____, so why try?"
  • “I’m no good.”
  • “Nobody cares, so why should I?"
  • “I can't handle _____."

Negative self-talk can prevent you from trying new things because you feel shame about yourself. And it’s not true, anyway! Many of these thoughts come from a place of hurt or shame in your childhood and have been reinforced throughout the years. But they’re self-defeating at best and cause self-hatred at worst. How can you be good at something if you give up quickly? How can you learn to handle things if you give up before you try?

 

Changing Your Self-Talk

Changing your self-talk won’t take place overnight, but you can get started today with more positive feelings. One way to help yourself feel better is to write out some affirmations for yourself and practice them every day. For example, when you find your self-talk keeps calling you stupid, start your day with a statement that changes the dialogue. “I am learning new things every day, and I am feeling smarter than ever before” is a great one to try. “I’m a good person, and I do good things for others” is a good answer to when you’re feeling “no good”.

Write down all of the negative talks you can think of on a piece of paper, and make new affirmations on index cards so that you can scroll through and read them to yourself every morning.

Talk to others such as your peers or therapist to learn other ways to banish negative self-talk. As you spend more time in recovery, you’ll find more examples of being the person you want to be, rather than the person your disease says you are. Hold on to your moments of accomplishment and give yourself credit.

 

Life After Treatment

Your journey in recovery doesn’t end once you have finished inpatient treatment. A sober living situation, aftercare plan and other activities can help you stay on course as you adjust to life after treatment. Want to learn more about your options? Please give us a call at 760-216-2077.

When you first get clean and sober, there’s a lot on your mind. Recovery can be both exciting and scary, especially when you don’t know what your next steps will be. Soon, however, you learn coping skills and make friends. Life starts looking up as you begin to confront your challenges head-on and still stay sober. Some days are better than others, however, and sometimes it’s hard to focus on the positive.

Not all of us are born with a sunny disposition, and it sometimes takes a genuine effort to keep a positive attitude or see the "good side" of things.

What kinds of things can you do to change your mood on a bad day or prevent you from living in a negative rut?

 

Here are five great ways to help you stay positive in recovery:

 

  1. Learn and practice meditation. Meditation can help you calm your inner self and connect with your purpose in life. Through guided breathing, relaxation and quietness, you can let go of your anxiety, anger, and fear and just be for a short while. People who meditate often find that they have less stress, higher energy levels, and a positive outlook in life. Not sure where to start? Try Youtube or other video websites to find meditations guided by professionals.
  2. Surround yourself with like-minded people. There are a lot of positive, happy people in recovery. Pay attention to people who inspire you at 12-step meetings, and make it a point to exchange contact information. Make it a point to hang out with people that seem to feel good about the life they’re leading.
  3. Give back to the world. Start volunteering either at 12-step meetings or local nonprofits such as soup kitchens. You have a lot to give, and giving helps you connect to your community. Enjoy the feeling of being helpful and valued.
  4. Set goals for yourself. Nothing feels better than setting and achieving goals. Make goals for days, weeks and months. Start small and work your way up to the “big ones” if you’re worried about failure. After all, it’s a day at a time. Every day clean and sober is an achievement.
  5. Keep a gratitude list. Find five things every day that you feel good about and write it down in a notebook. A year or two from now, you’ll be amazed at how many things have changed. 

Staying positive is an essential aspect of recovery, but sometimes things happen that cause us emotional strife. Don’t forget your necessary tools – if you’re down, pick up the phone, get to a meeting, or find a sober friend to spend time with. There are plenty of people who want to help you stay clean and sober, and they do genuinely care about your welfare.

 

Are you looking for more information on living in a safe, supportive, sober environment? Do you want to know more about aftercare programs to help you adapt to the “real world” once you have finished inpatient treatment? Give us a call. We can help you find out more about your options. Just get in touch at 760-216-2077

Hillary Clinton's team seems to be placing a higher level of attention to substance use disorders, formerly known as addiction and alcoholism, with the heroin and methamphetamine epidemic in rural America. Seems like awareness is at senate level and permeating the verbiage of the candidate, hoping that their words get placed into action. What's great is that, apart from using google hangouts (pretty tight to be staying current and involving multiple brainstorming), their focus is on decriminalizing lower drug offenses, placing a priority for mental health and attention to treatment rather than incarceration. Great step guys. Now go do it.

http://www.nytimes.com/politics/first-draft/2015/06/01/hillary-clinton-focuses-on-drug-addiction-after-learning-scale-of-problem/?_r=0

Sober Living San Diego


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/02/14/fifty-shades-of-grey-box-office/23405561/

And all the talk this month has been about Fifty Shades. That it's abusive. That it reflects poorly on relationships. The thing is, its selling. Profoundly. And its getting everyone talking (Got me). I had to see it personally and not criticize it without seeing it (typical, we all have strong opinions about what we don't know). Actually, I laughed like few times I have done so at the movies. Johnson's performance is spectacular. The new male actor wasn't as captivating, but the plot was. It gets to the role we rarely talk about in relationships: negotiating. What better place for negotiation than the business place. It has been polished. It has been refined. Relationships? Not so much. We can argue all day long but the art of relationships lies in negotiation. And do we? Not like business. Many times its the equivalent of being bothered of clauses Most begin in expectations that have never been mutually agreed on, only to become resentful at the mesmerized outcome. Have we advanced in our 'science of relationships'? I believe little. There is much more research on trauma or family dysfunction than there is about quality of relationships or basic contentment, less alone longevity (and if there is, there is not as much focus on it as there is on the famous 'less than half make it'). We can code social media platforms that increase our connection with the world, we can make billion dollar businesses with venture capital...but where are we in the science of relationships? (please, for those with strong moral or religious opinions, be the change and save yourself the pedestal, we are all here for the growing experience and if what you had was so wonderful you'd have as much talk going as a hundredth of this movie).
Synthesis: go see it. Think about it. Begin the conversation. Whatever gets us talking must be hitting an Achilles tendon.

GET CONFIDENTIAL HELP


phone-handsetmenuchevron-down linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram