Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Addiction Recovery

cognitive behavioral therapy for addiction

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a popular type of therapy that most recovery centers and rehabs incorporate into their treatment programs. CBT helps people change their thoughts and behaviors to become healthier and happier in recovery.

People with substance use disorder and other mental health disorders can benefit from CBT. So many actions and reactions come from our thoughts and emotions. By becoming more aware of how beliefs influence their feelings, behaviors, and reactions, a person can also begin the process of trying new things to cope with them. CBT can also help people understand how their thoughts and feelings keep them in a cycle of addiction.

Why Change Your Thoughts With CBT?

Cognitive behavioral therapy can help you recognize negative thought processes that may hold you back from change. Usually, these thoughts are centered on certain beliefs you have about yourself. They may even go back to childhood or something somebody once said about you. By examining these thoughts, you learn that you can challenge them.

CBT can help you address problematic thoughts and feelings to overcome addiction. Many people have triggers to use, such as feeling angry or anxious. In recovery, people learn how to cope with these feelings and override the desire to get high or drunk. They replace those thoughts and behaviors with something more positive.

Addiction treatment programs are known for helping people change their perspective, attitude, and behavior to start a new way of life. But CBT helps people without addictions, too. People with PTSD, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, and other mental health disorders can benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. Some people go to therapy to help them with specific behaviors or get through life changes like a divorce.

Anyone that needs help changing their life for the better can benefit from CBT.

How Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work?

As human beings, our behavior is connected with our beliefs about ourselves and the world we inhabit. CBT helps people examine how their thoughts are related to their behavior. People addicted to drugs act differently when in the throes of addiction. Thought processes were centered on using drugs. After using, a person may have felt guilty or inadequate.

Therapists can help people examine how their thoughts and feelings contributed to their addictive behavior. Many people have self-defeating thoughts that lead to behavior they later regret.

By using CBT, addicted people learn how to identify and counter their negative thoughts with more positive outcomes. With time and practice, people learn to overcome obstacles and stay sober, making better decisions in their daily lives.

Considering Sober Living?

Are you looking for a safe, structured community with other people in recovery? Many people go to a sober living home while they continue their recovery journey. Learn more about our programs by calling at 760-216-2077.

 

 

Sober living homes often help provide continuing care after a shorter-term addiction treatment program. Recovering housing and sober living programs are meant to help people in recovery transition to their new life. This means helping them stay sober while working on specific goals. Everyone in the home is also living a life centered on recovery. Because it is a community, everyone will have some responsibility within the residence. With structure and support, people in sober homes are able to focus on their recovery.

Life After Treatment: Accountability and Responsibility

Become responsible happens a day at a time. Many people in recovery housing begin working, return to school, or take a career training program. This is to help them begin to establish responsible foundations for their next stop in life. You may have wrecked your finances or lost a promising career due to addiction. Cleaning up the pieces may take time. Everyone needs to be self-sufficient, so you will likely need to get work to pay your slice of the rent. If you are not disabled or receiving retirement income, you will be responsible for finding an income.

Many of your goals won’t be accomplished overnight. You may want to save for a car or a deposit for an apartment. Working on these goals is important, but you can’t put them before your recovery. Living in harmony and balance is also a challenge you may have to face. In sober living, you don’t have to face your challenges alone. Other people are rooting for you.

Learning to balance your lifestyle is essential. Sober living can help you juggle your responsibilities and learn more about staying sober while living a full life. You’ll also participate in a community as part of a household, paying rent, attending house meetings, and doing chores. House rules may include curfews, regular drug tests, or completed / continuance of outpatient therapy. But you may have fewer rules depending on the program.

Who Benefits From Sober Living?

Sober living homes are an exciting choice for newly sober people. While living a clean and simple lifestyle, there is also structured support. People often continue outpatient treatment, attend 12-step meetings, and go to therapy while living in a sober household.

People in sober living homes often make recovery friendships for life. Sober living is a great way to stay plugged into a recovery community. They’re a great place to spread your wings and build a strong recovery foundation.

Sober living helps people become more accountable to others as well as themselves. Being in a community requires following rules., People who have completed treatment programs and been sober for a while may want their next step in their journey to have stability and independence.

People new to recovery who has a solid foundation in recovery are typically welcome in sober homes. Sober living benefits people who need a bit of peer support and accountability in their recovery journey.

Learn More About Sober Living

Are you or somebody you love interested in learning more about sober living homes? Do you have questions about our programs? Give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn more.

Many people live in recovery-centered communities as a part of their recovery journey. Some people experience the community approach to recovery at inpatient drug treatment. Many people also choose a community approach to their recovery by living in sober housing. People who live in a sober living community are also part of a therapeutic community with a focus on community and healing. Sober living, based on the community model of treatment, is a great option for your recovery journey.

Why Community-Centered Treatment? How Does It Help?

The community treatment model works on helping people change in a communal setting. The environment in sober living homes focuses on recovery and positive change. Being around others with similar focus and goals can help people stay sober.

Community members are encouraged to practice honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness. Participating in a recovery community means taking responsibility for yourself and your recovery. Sometimes this means hard work, but as you continue to grow in the program, you’re given more freedom and responsibility.

Recovery work, therapy, and MAT may be a part of your treatment. However, everyone in the community will have their own specific goals and issues to work on. You will learn to live in harmony with a sober lifestyle.

What Do People In A Sober Living Community Do With Their Time?

Most community members attend 12-step meetings, have group therapy, and go out together. Some people will take to the beach or road to surf or jog. There will usually be shared chores that are alternated weekly or monthly. Grocery shopping and cooking are often communal.

Therapy and 12-step groups will be a big part of sober living. After all, staying sober comes before everything else.

The goal for a person in sober living is to use the tools they’ve acquired to continue to stay sober, reclaim their lives, and take on more responsibilities. Some people start to resolve wreckage from the past, such as missed court appearances, old speeding tickets, or charged-off credit cards. Making amends and doing the right thing are important goals to work towards.

For some participants, this means getting a part-time job or a job training program. Moving towards independence and becoming ready to move forward is a part of recovery in this stage.

Becoming Stronger Together With A Community

For many people in sober living communities, having the support of peers is vital. Active participation in group activities helps people inspire each other and continue to move towards their recovery goals.

A recovery community emphasizes group learning and peer support. People come together to rally around community members who are struggling. They also offer support to each other regularly. People in sober living homes find a family-like community where they come together, no matter their flaws, to become better people. Everyone’s goal is

Being supportive is an essential part of growing in recovery. A recovery community is a great place to practice empathy, build coping skills, and learn how to have healthier relationships. Feeling at home in a recovery community helps keep people sober, helps them practice coping skills, and helps with relapse prevention.

Learn About Sober Living Options

If you or somebody you love is looking for a recovery community, our sober housing program may suit you. Give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn more about our communities.

 

Addiction Is a treatable disease, and trust-building with loved ones is integral to the healing process. For some couples, it makes sense to seek couples therapy and strengthen their relationship. Couples therapy offers a space and time for romantic partners to work on their issues with a facilitator.

People who struggle with substance use disorder often have trouble in their relationships. After all, addiction is a disease of the brain. As a person becomes dependent on a substance, the way they act and think may change. The brain is focused on making its reward system happy rather than being a reasonable and responsible family member.

Why Couples Therapy?

Addiction is a disease that can leave much damage in its wake. It’s hard for partners and other loved ones to watch as somebody spirals out of control. They may try to help their partner only to be “shut out” or lied to.

Addiction is a family disease, and everyone in the addicted person’s life is affected by it. For some families, many false notions of stigma are still attached to the idea of addiction. People may be hurt or overwhelmed when their loved one admits there’s a problem.

Families, love, and emotions are complex. Addiction recovery helps the addicted person begin to rebuild their lives and stay sober. Therapy helps everyone adjust to the new changes and find ways to build trust together. A therapist can help facilitate difficult conversations about commitment, fears, sadness, anger, and past hurts that must be addressed.

Addiction Education In Couple’s Therapy

It’s essential to seek out a therapist that understands and works with families who live with a person with substance use issues. Many treatment centers and sober living communities have access to therapy for couples to work together.

Educating family members is also a big part of family therapy. Understanding that addiction is a disease of the brain, but it’s treatable is essential. Families need education about addiction's physical, mental, and emotional effects. They also need to learn more about recovery in general.

Couples may have experienced financial issues, job loss, arrests, and other wreckage. Sorting through and acknowledging the hurt with a professional can help couples build a healthier relationships.

Consider A Sober Living Community Post-Treatment

For many people, even married couples, treatment is just the beginning of a long journey toward long-term sobriety. After treatment, a sober living home can offer the community and support structure to start living life in early recovery. Learn more about your housing options by contacting us at 760-216-2077.

Many people who decide to get sober use tools like Medication-Assisted Treatment to reduce withdrawal symptoms and help them focus on their recovery. Sublocade is a Medication-Assisted Treatment option many people prefer because it’s only administered once a month. It is prescribed and administered by medical professionals for people with opioid use disorder who want to stay sober.

What Is Sublocade?

Sublocade contains the drug buprenorphine and is administered monthly in a medical provider’s office. For many people, it’s a safe and responsible way to go about their lives while getting relief from withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings.

Sublocade works best when the person taking it also gets counseling via drug treatment or one-on-one therapy. This can help newly sober people gain insight into themselves and understand their addiction. Opioid use disorder is manageable, but Medication-Assisted treatment is only part of managing it. Getting therapy can also help somebody learn new coping skills and learn to live a more authentic, happy life drug-free.

How Often Is Sublocade Needed?

People prescribed Sublocade need to get the injection monthly in a healthcare provider’s office. Most treatment providers will start patients with a 300mg dosage and eventually will be weaned down to a lower dose, usually 100mg. Some people will stay on 300mg longer if their healthcare provider deems it necessary.

People can use Sublocade as MAT for as long as the doctor approves. Some people will get an injection for months, while others may need to stay on it for years.

Sublocade Injections Increase Sobriety Success Rates

According to the manufacturer, in one clinical study, people treated with Sublocade were fourteen times more likely to complete their treatment programs and stay sober. 28% of people who got therapy/treatment alongside their MAT stayed sober for at least 24 months.

In the study, the group that was given a placebo only had a 3% success rate over the same period. While some people did relapse in the more successful group, everyone who stayed sober for at least 80% of those 24 months did so with the help of Sublocade.

Consider Sober Living

If you or somebody you love needs a safe space to lay their head, sober living may be the healthiest choice. Living in an environment where people work toward positive change can be inspiring and help you stay focused on your goals. Learn more about our communities by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Contingency management, a type of behavioral therapy, is an unusual but highly effective treatment for people who live with substance use disorder. In programs that use contingency management, people who participate agree to stay sober. They receive positive reinforcement when they do so successfully and meet specific goals the program sets. Typically, this type of reinforcement is in the form of monetary compensation, gift cards, or even prizes. Sometimes these programs will also do the same for awarding privileges within a treatment facility. (Usually, all participants are regularly drug-tested to ensure compliance and honesty.)

Who Is Contingency Management For?

Contingency management is often a good fit for people who experience multiple challenges. Substance use disorder does not discriminate, and many people who live with dual diagnoses find motivation within programs using this model.

People addicted to multiple substances may find contingency management helps them become more committed to their treatment plans. Contingency management helps people stay sober and comply with treatment plans. In California, people addicted to methamphetamine successfully completed treatment programs that used contingency management.

Contingency management is also used in therapy for people with mental health disorders who want to work on their goals.

What Kinds Of Behavior Is Rewarded In Contingency Management?

People who participate in the therapy may be rewarded for taking specific actions which help them begin and maintain their recovery. People may earn rewards for good attendance, adhering to their medications, staying sober, attending 12-step meetings, and other aspects of their treatment.

For most people in outpatient treatment, many actions may need to be taken. People who are on probation, for example, may also be rewarded for working towards other goals such as applying for jobs or going back to school. They may need to balance going to therapy and twelve-step meetings as well as work.

The treatment helps people stick to a vital routine focused on recovery. Motivation and rewards can help people stay centered in recovery and feel good about themselves.

Sober Living and Housing

Sober living homes often combine both recovery and independence. People living in these homes share the same goals and can work toward being responsible and sober together. There are both community responsibilities as well as opportunities to bond and grow. Learn more about our peaceful, sober-focused communities by calling us at 760-216-2077.

People who live with substance use disorder are more prone to developing an addiction that’s not drugs. There are many reasons that this can happen, and they all still come down to the disease of addiction.

What Kinds Of Behaviors Can Become Addictive?

Addiction involves both obsession and compulsion. Your brain and body craved alcohol or drugs before you got sober. It will recognize when an activity boosts feel-good chemicals such as serotonin. People who live with substance use disorder may be involved in activities that, while not healthy, feel hard to stop thinking about or doing.

These feelings are compulsive, like an addiction; when you do an activity or use a substance repeatedly, the brain's reward center will still be activated. You may follow your innate drive to “get more” of that feeling, leading to very unhealthy results.

Activities that can be compulsive or addictive:

  • Exercise
  • Bodybuilding
  • Binging/Purging food
  • Caffeine Consumption
  • Vaping/smoking cigarettes
  • Extreme sports
  • Working
  • Speeding
  • Shoplifting
  • Gambling
  • Sexual activity
  • Watching pornography

As you can see from the list, not all the activities that are addictive would be considered “bad” in moderation. Productive activities like work are great in moderation. But if your life surrounds your job, you may be throwing yourself into a whole new addiction cycle. Risk-taking behavior like speeding or skydiving also releases a lot of feel-good endorphins, which is why so many people engage in them.

Exercising once a day or every few days is healthy, but spending hours running or lifting weights could cause muscle injury and exhaustion. Drinking a cup of coffee once a day may be fine for your health, but if you find yourself living off of coffee, your health could be affected.

The Dangers Of New Addictions

When you become addicted to something besides substances, you’re in relapse mode. New addictions can bring back old behavior patterns, such as lying or minimizing your behavior. You may start to think there are other parts of recovery that you can cut corners from.

Lying about your addiction or falling into other old behavior patterns, such as minimizing your behavior, can be a trigger for relapse. Staying honest with yourself means reaching out when you realize your new addiction is a problem. You are powerless over your addiction, but you have the power to ask for help.

With a sponsor or therapist, you can start looking at your triggers and begin to abstain from compulsive behaviors. There are many healthier coping mechanisms that you can begin to do. Mindfulness, talk therapy, and meditation are just a few tools available.

You’re a human being, and you’re allowed to make mistakes. Don’t get high or drunk no matter what. Your recovery matters!

Consider Sober Living

Learning to live a sober lifestyle is an important part of your first steps in recovery! A sober living situation is often an excellent launchpad for people new to recovery. You can be around peers with similar goals as you begin to plot your next chapter of life. Learn more about sober housing by calling us at 760-216-2077.

People who live with substance use disorder often have other behavior and health problems that need to be treated. Insomnia is a frequent complaint when people stop using alcohol or drugs. Some people only experience it while they are in withdrawal. For other people, sleep issues like insomnia can be persistent. Why is this?

Sleep Disturbances In Recovery

You may also experience other sleep issues, such as nightmares or trouble falling asleep if you have insomnia. While it may be disturbing, it’s a natural occurrence and often thought to result from long-term detoxing as your body rewires your brain. Some people have trouble falling asleep, while others may wake up feeling wide awake in the middle of the night.

People with alcohol use disorder may have more trouble falling asleep than others. Almost 25% of people who have an alcohol problem have sleep issues. People with opioid use disorder also have trouble sleeping during their first year sober as their body adjusts to life without substances. Dreams like drug dreams or dreams about past trauma can also disturb sleep.

Sleep Is Important

A lack of sleep can cause significant issues for people in recovery and should not go unaddressed. When you don’t sleep, your body and mind have trouble recovering and preparing for the next day. Lack of sleep can make you more susceptible to accidents or infections. For many people, insomnia causes additional stress that makes people more vulnerable to relapse.

Sleep is important to emotional and physical healing. Try to give yourself at least 8 hours to sleep every night.

Addressing Insomnia And Sleep Problems

Most people begin to sleep better after their first few months sober, but others may suffer from a sleep disorder. Sleeping disorders can be treated through cognitive behavioral therapy, meditation, and relaxation exercises.

Behavioral changes may help a person establish a new sleep routine. Limiting activities in bed such as reading or “doomscrolling” can help signal to your body that it is time to rest. Establishing a simple nightly routine such as brushing your teeth, writing your gratitude list, and going to bed can also help prepare your mind and body to relax. Over-the-counter remedies for sleep can be a trigger for drug use. Don’t try to solve a sleep disorder on your own.

If you’re desperate for sleep, seek professional help. A medical doctor or psychiatrist can help you determine the best course of treatment for sleep issues.

Consider Sober Living

If you are newly sober and looking for a safe, recovery-focused home full of community, sober living may be right for you. Learn more about how it works by calling 760-216-2077.

 

Relapse is common for people early in recovery. Emotions are raw, new feelings and experiences may be intimidating, and some triggers may make people feel like using. It’s well known that addiction is common among people who have experienced trauma. When this trauma, such as early childhood abuse or sexual assault, goes unaddressed, it causes a wound that can affect a person’s entire life.

Unaddressed trauma is a well-known relapse trigger for people who struggle with a substance use disorder. It’s common for people in early recovery to have symptoms of anxiety, depression, or even PTSD when they get sober. Research shows that people who have been diagnosed with PTSD are more likely to relapse when they experience symptoms of the disorder.

Why Is Trauma A Relapse Trigger?

When you have experienced trauma, either in your childhood or as an adult, you probably adapted your life to survive. Some people shut down and go numb in the face of anxiety, while others self-medicate to make themselves feel numb. The emotions, physical sensations, and even dreams surrounding the trauma can make a person feel like they are reliving it repeatedly.

Newcomers to recovery feel a roller coaster of emotions during and after detox. These emotions may be related to things that happened today or long ago. Trauma, hurt, and shame often rears their head in people who live with PTSD. Angry and frightened outbursts can also occur occasionally when people feel like they’re in the grip of a traumatic situation again.

The intense emotions surrounding trauma can make a person want to do anything to escape their feelings, quickly leading to using their drug of choice again.

Working On Understanding Trauma

Trauma is something that people in the addiction profession watch for in addicted persons. Therapy, medication, if needed, and self-care are all important ways to begin healing from the pain of past trauma. In treatment and therapy, you will start new relationships and practice trusting yourself and others again.

Being reminded of trauma may make you feel shameful or afraid. Trauma is nothing to be ashamed of; if somebody hurt you or something happened to you, it’s not your fault. Acknowledging the pain and hurt is essential to recovery. Shame is a normal reaction, but as you will learn, feelings aren’t facts.

In recovery, you will learn to love yourself and feel comfortable in your skin again. Healing from the trauma of the past takes time and willingness. Treatment can offer a safe space for you to begin the healing journey. The journey starts with deciding to stay clean.

Staying clean will mean learning to love yourself again and working on healing your self-defeating thoughts and behaviors. Working through the trauma will help you understand how it affects you today. If you need help getting help for your trauma, reach out and ask.

Sober Living Options

Trauma-informed therapy and recovery can help you thrive even when you feel your past traumas are overwhelming.

Recovery is available to everyone! Sober living offers a safe, structured environment to continue your healing journey and focus on recovery. Learn more about what we offer by calling us at 760-216-2077.

Doctors prescribe many medications to help with mental health disorders, including anxiety disorders and PTSD. Some anxiety medications, however, are also highly addictive. People who become dependent on drugs like Xanax or Klonopin may develop a tolerance and need more medication to get the same effects. Some people who have taken these drugs long-term may end up abusing them.

Long-term use, and increased dosages, can create a physical dependence on the drug. A person with a substance use disorder may take larger amounts of the medication than prescribed. It's recommended that people with a substance use disorder steer clear of prescription anxiety medications that are also addictive.

Which Types of Prescription Anxiety Medications Are Addictive?

First of all, benzodiazepines, such as Xanax are highly addictive. Other drugs that are not prescribed as often for anxiety, such as sedatives like Valium, also have the potential for abuse or addiction. These classes of drugs, when taken in large amounts and stopped suddenly, can also cause withdrawal effects like fevers, shaking, or even seizures or heart palpitations.

Many people initially take the prescribed amount of a drug to get help with their anxiety. Drugs like benzos or sedatives can create peaceful or even euphoric feelings in the user. It’s not surprising that these effects can cause a person to take more than prescribed.

Anti-anxiety pills can help people cope with anxiety, but sometimes they become the only coping mechanism. They also stop working so well. Addiction to a drug can cause you to experience intense anxiety when you are in withdrawal. This can create a cycle of substance use that it feels hard to escape.

 

Alternative Methods For Coping With Anxiety

When a person quits using a benzo or sedative to help with their anxiety, there are other methods for treating their anxiety. Prescription drugs like Lexapro are helpful for anxiety and depression and do not cause any euphoric feelings. A psychiatrist is best qualified to help with medication changes. There are also therapy groups and methods such as mindfulness that can help you begin to work through anxiety.

Getting sober and no longer abusing substances will help you live with less anxiety. In treatment or 12-step groups, you’ll learn new coping skills. Therapy can help you learn more about your anxiety, cope with anxiety and begin to practice more healthy coping skills.

Stay Focused On Sober Living

Many people who want to stay sober find refuge in recovery communities like sober homes. In a sober living situation, you’ll be part of a group of peers on the recovery journey. Structure, camaraderie, and therapy can help you stay on course as you learn to live life substance-free.

Learn more about sober living by calling us at 760-216-2077.

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